Houston Cemetery Tours

Howard Hughes 1905-1976. Once the wealthiest man in the world, he inherited and expanded Hughes Oil. He owned RKO and TWA and enjoyed racing cars.We offer over 1 dozen different 5-hour long Houston Cemetery Tours. These are divided by geography. Each tour contains a variety of cemeteries, including prominent, historic, and ethnic minority cemeteries such as Asian, African American, Hispanic, and/or Jewish cemeteries. Each cemetery tour will include unique artwork and narratives about the history of the cemetery. The cemeteries are listed in alphabetical order within each category below.Gravesite of Henry MacGregor - 1855 - 1923. He came to Houston in 1883 and was the benefoactor of MacGregor Park and MacGregor clinics.

We go to over 100 cemeteries. These include active, abandoned, and occasionally lost cemeteries. Lost cemeteries are cemeteries that are not visible to the public because they may be submerged under water, overgrown with weeds and brush, and or on private grounds. Many of these cemeteries are in former unincorporated towns, such as Alief, Almeda, Barrett Station, Fairbanks, Genoa, and Riceville that Houston annexed. Other cemeteries are in formerly incorporated towns, such as Harrisburg and Magnolia Park that agreed to be taken over by Houston after World War I. Some of the cemeteries are in separate cities such as Deer Park, Missouri City, Pasadena, Pearland, Spring, Sugar Land, Tomball, and Webster. Most are in Harris County, although not necessarily in Houston. A few cemeteries are in Brazoria County, Chambers County, Fort Bend County, and Montgomery County.

Cooley family plot. Denton Cooley's family founded and helped settle the Houston Heights. The heart in the picture will one day mark Denton Cooley's grave.Number of Cemeteries on Each Tour – Each tour within I-610, A, B, and C, includes at least 9 cemeteries and or sites.  With the exception of Tour N, all other tours have at least 6 cemeteries on the tours if they are outside of I-610 as more time is necessary to travel to them.  We may also include some cemeteries that we have recently discovered and have not yet included on our website. Some tours have more than 10 cemeteries. Please feel free to enlighten us with any additional cemeteries that you know.

Etiquette – Remember that we must always be deferential to any service, ceremony, burial, and internment that may occur. Please be modest in the loudness of your speech and behavior. Be careful when walking in abandoned cemeteries as the ground is uneven and unpaved.

Clothing – If you plan on walking in a cemetery, wear the following:

  1. Closed toe comfortable shoes.
  2. Long sleeve blouses or shirts, and slacks or pants if the cemetery is an abandoned one.
  3. Protective eye wear if the cemetery has been neglected.
  4. Insect repellent if rain has fallen during the past 48 hours and the weather is warm.
  5. Sunscreen if the day is hot and sunny.

Starting and Finishing Location – All of these tours begin at the Visitors Center (VC), located on the first floor of City Hall at 901 Bagby Street, Houston, Texas 77002. One can park under Tranquility Park at 510 Rusk Street on your GPS at Theater Parking 2. This is one block north of City Hall. Check with the city for the cost of parking.

Customized Tours – If one would like a tour of only African American, Jewish, or predominantly White cemeteries, or other ethnic groups ask us about designing one for you.

Cost — The price varies with the amount of driving to be done and fuel used.

Tours A — C, within the I-610 Loop

The price is the same as a city tour of 5 hours

Tours D — J, within SH 518 (Tour D), SH 6 (Tours E, F, & G) Beltway 8 (Tours H, I,  & J)

The price is the same as a city tour of 6 hours

Tours K +, mostly outside of Beltway 8 and in other cities

The price is the same as a city tour of 7 hours

 

We offer the following tours:


Houston Cemetery Tour A – Central Houston

This tour is south of Washington Avenue, east of I-610 West, north of I-610 South, and west of I-45.  Five cemeteries and 1 one site are south of Buffalo Bayou and 3 are north of Buffalo Bayou.  The geographic area covers Freedmen’s Town within the 4th Ward, more of the 4th Ward, 1st Ward, and the Houston Heights.  It includes:

  1. College Park Cemetery – This is the fourth oldest African American cemetery in Houston. Houston's most famous civil rights leader of the 1800s, Jack Yates, is buried here. It has been abandoned since 1970.
  2. Congregation Beth Israel Cemetery – This is the oldest Jewish cemetery in Texas, dating from 1844. It is a who's who of the mercantile families of Houston – Battlestein, Levy Brothers, Gordon, Finger, Meyer, Sakowitz, Zindler, as well as Ben Taub, the famous rabbis Henry Barnston and Hyman Judah Schachtel, and more. This is the oldest Jewish institution in the state.
  3. Congregation Beth (Adath) Yeshurun Cemetery – This is the second oldest Jewish cemetery in the city for the second oldest Jewish congregation in Houston. Congregation Beth Yeshurun dates back to 1892. It is the largest Conservative Jewish congregation in the nation. In 1946, congregations Beth El and Adath Yeshurun merged, creating Congregation Beth Yeshurun.
  4. Founders Cemetery – This is the oldest White Christian cemetery original to the city from 1836. One of the founding Allen brothers, John Kirby Allen, is buried here.
  5. Glenwood Cemetery – This is the River Oaks for the Dead.  This was the first cemetery in Houston with perpetual care. It dates to 1872.  A lovely cemetery with rolling hills, it includes Howard Hughes, George Hermann, the Hobby family, the wife Charlotte Allen of one of the cofounders of Houston, the last President of Texas Anson Jones, actress Gene Tierney, as well as actor Clark Gable's second wife, the Rice family, the Baker and Botts families, and far more prominent people. The cemetery has banned buses in it in recent years.
  6. Magnolia Cemetery – This started as a German Methodist Cemetery in 1884. Gus Wortham is buried here.
  7. Trinity Lutheran Cemetery – This 3 acre cemetery was found in 1885. It is adjacent to Glenwood Cemetery and is not known to most people.
  8. Washington Cemetery – This was formerly known as German Cemetery and the Deutsche Gesellschaft (German Society). This cemetery has headstones written in German. One of the most famous residents is Sarah Emma Edmonds, AKA Emma Seeyle, AKA Franklin Thompson, the only woman to receive a pension from the United States government for her service in the Civil War.
  9. Disappeared Episcopal Cemetery and Masonic Cemetery.

Lunch is usually at a Cafe Express, Souper Salads, or a restaurant along West Dalls Street or Washington Avenue.

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Houston Cemetery Tour B – North Central

This tour is north of Washington Avenue, east of I-610 West, south of I-610 North, and east of US 59. It includes:

  1. Adath Emeth Cemetery – This is an Orthodox Jewish cemetery where the Weiner family is buried. Its congregation was established in 1905. 
  2. Donnellan Crypt – This former crypt lies by Buffalo Bayou in downtown Houston.  At least four people were interred here between 1849 and 1867. They were reinterred in 1901. See how much lower Houston used to exist.
  3. Eichwurzel Family Cemetery – This family cemetery is situated between two homes in a residential neighborhood. It was active from 1907 to 1954.  Many graves were washed away in the 1915 storm.  Only about 15 graves remain. 
  4. Hollywood Cemetery – Found in 1895. It is on Little White Oak Bayou and once had a lake in it. Today, it is the home of librarian Julia B. Ideson, Japanese rice farmer Shinpei Mykawa, and Confederate spy and circus leader Mollie Arline Bailey.
  5. Holy Cross Cemetery – This Catholic cemetery has graves dating to 1878. It is the second Catholic cemetery in Houston. It has a variety of segregated sections for different races and ethnicities of Catholics: African Americans, Czechs, German, Hispanics, Irish, Italians, Lebanese, and Poles.
  6. Olivewood Cemetery – This was the most prominent African American cemetery in Houston. Methodists it in the 1870s. It has been abandoned since the 1980s. Educators James Ryan and Charles Atherton are among the prominent people buried here. 
  7. Remnants of the Old City Cemetery that was nicknamed Confederate Cemetery.
  8. Vollmer – Niemann Cemetery – This cemetery was established circa 1878. The families include Clay, Hillendahl, Niemann, Sauer, Thiel, Hilton, and Vollmer. It has approximately 31 graves.
  9. Fake Cemetery – In the spring of 2013, one ingenious person decided to create a fake cemetery to keep people off of his property. He placed 3 headstones on his green space and surrounded it with a fence. 

Lunch is usually at a restaurant along North Main Street, North Airline Street or I-45.

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Houston Cemetery Tour C – East Side

This tour is east of I-45, south of I-10, and within I-610. The geographic area covers Harrisburg, Magnolia Park, Lawndale, the East End, 2nd Ward and 5th Ward. It includes:

  1. Dawson-Lunnon Cemetery – This is a Black cemetery hat operated from 1915 to 1950 for the now defunct and destroyed Mt. Gilead Missionary Baptist Church to which it was adjacent. 
  2. Evergreen Cemetery – This is an interesting neighborhood cemetery with a significant Hispanic section. It was established in 1894.
  3. Evergreen Negro Cemetery – This African American cemetery dates to the 1890s. It has been abandoned since 1950. The city paved a street through the middle of the cemetery in the 1960s. This is located in the 5th Ward.
  4. Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery – It is arguably the prettiest cemetery in Houston. It is the 3rd largest cemetery in Texas. It has tremendous works of art including Tiffany stained-glass windows, a lake, a pond, Braes Bayou along one side, ducks, and far more. Many historic Houstonians and Texans are buried here, including Jesse Jones, Oscar Holcombe, "Red" Adair, Hugh Roy Cullen, Lloyd Bentsen, and more.
  5. Glendale Cemetery – This is the oldest White cemetery in Houston. This has some of the earliest families of Harrisburg, Magnolia Park, and Houston, including the Harris family, Briscoe family, Charles Milby, and James Deady.
  6. Harrisburg – Jackson Cemetery – This is the oldest African American cemetery in Houston. It has been abandoned since 1967.  It has former enslaved people, veterans of the Civil War, World War I, World War II, and many others.
  7. Pugh – Gerhart Cemetery – This cemetery was active from 1880 to 1951.  Two families had dozens of people buried here. Its original entrance was at Old Clinton Drive, but that road does not exist. It has been abandoned and neglected for decades. Weeds and growth are more than 10 feet high. Be prepared to bring a machete or hedge clippers to make your way through this eerie cemetery. Other than a small deteriorating sign, it is not visible.
  8. St. Vincent's Cemetery – This is the oldest Catholic cemetery in Houston. It dates to 1852. It has heroes of the Texas Revolution and some of the earliest pioneers. Dick Dowling is buried here. This is in the 2nd Ward.
  9. Villa de Matel Convent Cemetery – This is where the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word's nuns without families are buried.  It is a private cemetery located behind the 1928 Romanesque chapel that was designed by Maurice J. Sullivan.

Lunch is at an eastside restaurant. It could be Brady’s Landing, the Dinner Bell Cafeteria, Cici's Pizza, or make a suggestion.

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Houston Cemetery Tour D – Greater Southeast Houston

This tour is west of I-45, east of SH 288, and north of FM 518. This tour goes into Pearland and Webster.

  1. Dagg Family Cemetery – This is a family cemetery on an isolated road near a combination of ranches and houses. It is an active cemetery with burials dating from the early 1900s through 2009.
  2. Davis Cemetery – This is an abandoned African American cemetery used in the 1950s and 1960s.
  3. Forest Lawn Cemetery AKA Genoa Cemetery.
  4. Forest Park East Cemetery – It opened in 1951. Notables from NASA are buried here, former baseball player Pete Runnels, one of the victims of the Aggie bonfire debacle, and Andrea Yates's five children among others.
  5. Houston Memorial Gardens – It started in 1954. This is an African American cemetery.
  6. Old Settler’s Cemetery – Found in 1894, the same year that Pearland was established. It was the town’s only cemetery for decades. The last burial was in the 1950s.
  7. Paradise Cemetery South – This is an African American cemetery in Pearland.
  8. Resurrection Cemetery – This is Pearland’s only Catholic cemetery. It has a Vietnamese section.
  9. South Park Cemetery – This is in Pearland. It has separate Chinese and Vietnamese sections and two rock formations with waterfalls.

Lunch is generally at a restaurant along SH 288/South Freeway, FM 518/Broadway Street, or SH 35/Main Street.

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Houston Cemetery Tour E – Greater Southwest Houston

This tour is west of SH 288, north of FM 518 and SH 6, and east of US 59.

  1. Almeda Cemetery – This served the unincorporated town of Almeda in from the 1890s to through the mid-1900s.
  2. Beth Jacob Cemetery – This is an active Orthodox Jewish cemetery that was established in the 1940s..
  3. Congregation Emanu El Memorial Park – This is the newest of the Jewish independent cemeteries in Houston. The congregation was established in 1944. It has a pretty open-air chapel.
  4. Dewalt Cemetery – This cemetery is in Missouri City. It is a lost cemetery with no apparent headstones. It was established in 1850.
  5. Riceville Cemetery – This little cemetery is almost unknown, hidden away by a tributary to Brays Bayou. This is a historic African American cemetery that served the farmers of what today is known as Fondren Southwest. It is still active!
  6. San Isidro Cemetery – This Hispanic cemetery was begun in the 1930s and is still active. Nearby burials date to 1918. It is hidden in Sugar Land.

Lunch is generally at a restaurant along Bissonnet Street, US 59, or SH 288/South Freeway.

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Houston Cemetery Tour F – Greater West Houston

This tour is west of I-610, south of I-10, north of US 59, and east of SH 6. It includes:

  1. Alief Cemetery – This open cemetery was established by 1900. It has the founders of the community. 
  2. Beeler Family Cemetery – This fenced small cemetery has 6 burials from 1888 to 1944. It is located amongst energy buildings. 
  3. Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery – This holy ground has the largest collection of Asians. It has the first feng shui eternal resting place in Texas, established in 2007. This is a beautifully landscaped area. Among the notable Houstonians are defense attorney Percy Foreman, Mayor Roy Hofheinz, and civic leader Edward Stumpf III. It was found in 956. It has a beautiful chapel. 
  4. McGee Chapel Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery – This African American cemetery has had people buried in from 1914 through 2007. Many of the headstones are hand-carved. The church is next to it.
  5. Memorial Oaks Cemetery – This moderate size cemetery has an old horse drawn hearse in a small building at the entrance. 
  6. Morse – Bragg Cemetery – This is also known as McFee Cemetery. This is a lost cemetery. It was active from 1840 to 1874. All markers have been destroyed or stolen.  A recent post has been installed to identify it. Each resident of the West Oaks subdivision owns 1/64 of it.
  7. Prairie Grove Cemetery – This is an African American cemetery in Alief.It dates to the late 1800s or the early 1900s. It has about 20 to 25 graves.

Lunch is usually at a restaurant on Bellaire Boulevard, Westheimer Road, or State Highway 6.

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Houston Cemetery Tour G – Greater West Northwest Houston

This tour is north of I-10, west of I-610, south of US 290, and east of SH 6. It includes:

  1. Bear Creek Methodist Church Cemetery – This cemetery has been active since 1904.
  2. Congregation Beth (El) Yeshurun Cemetery – This is a Jewish cemetery established in 1926. In 1946, congregations Beth El and Adath Yeshurun merged, creating Congregation Beth Yeshurun.
  3. Fairbanks Cemetery – This was established at about 1900. It is on 4 acres. This is an active cemetery with hundreds of burials.  The earliest burial is dated in 1897. Several of the markers are homemade and some are simple crosses. It is across from a Methodist Church.
  4. Gastmann-Ohlendorf Cemetery – Four headstones representing 5 people from the 1870s to 1937 are the final resting places for these two families.
  5. Hillendahl Cemetery – Eighteen headstones are in the small cemetery located in the parking lot of a strip mall. Most of the headstones have no dates. he dated ones range from 1870 to 1939. Most of the deceased ere Germans. This was on the old Hillendahl farm.
  6. Hillendahl-Eggling Cemetery – This was also known as the Blue Light Cemetery. It was active from the 1850s to 1902. It is considered spooky. Several fatal vehicle and murders have taken place in the vicinity. It is in the Addicks Reservoir and a park. In the 1970s and 1980s, people reportedly held occult meetings here. In 2012, a new bridge over Langham Creek replaced the old allegedly haunted one in the area.
  7. Koch-Schmidt Cemetery – This cemetery is in a park and has a cemetery within a cemetery. Its roughly 31 headstones date from 1854 to 1930.
  8. St. Peter’s United Church of Christ Cemetery – This is an old 1800s cemetery hidden behind a church.
  9. Woodlawn Cemetery –This is a large multi-ethnic cemetery in the near northwest side of town.

Lunch is usually at a restaurant along either I-10 or US 290.

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Houston Cemetery Tour H – North Northwest Houston

This tour is north of I-610, between US 290 and I-45, and south of Beltway 8. It includes:

  1. Baker Cemetery – This cemetery has also been known as the Janisch Cemetery and Old Yale Cemetery. It was begun c. 1936. The latest burial was in 1987. The most easily read headstone is dated December 15, 1941. It has 3 visible headstones.
  2. Cemetery Beautiful – This active African American cemetery has perpetual care.
  3. Houston National Cemetery – This is a veterans cemetery.
  4. Paradise North Cemetery – This is an active African American cemetery.
  5. Restlawn Cemetery – This is another African American cemetery, almost adjacent to Cemetery Beautiful. Interestingly, portions of this cemetery are maintained and portions are abandoned.
  6. St. John's German Evangelical (Lutheran) Cemetery – It was started in 1860. It is on 2.3 acres in the old White Oak Community. It has hundreds of headstones and is an active cemetery. The original wooden church that it was situated by is now in Sam Houston Park in downtown Houston

Lunch is usually at a restaurant along State Highway 249 or I-45.

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Houston Cemetery Tour I – Greater North Northeast Houston

This tour is between I-45 and US 59 and north of I-610, and south of Beltway 8. It includes:

  1. Adath Israel Cemetery – It is from 1910, it is an old Orthodox Jewish cemetery.
  2. Aldine Cemetery – This is an abandoned cemetery with about one-half dozen headstones.
  3. Brookside Funeral Home and Memorial Park – The cemetery has served the Houston community since the 1930s. It has over 290 acres, including a mausoleum, private estates, a crematorium, and multiple gardens.
  4. Morales/Santa Teresa Cemetery – This is the oldest Hispanic cemetery, dating to 1940.
  5. Schlobolm Family Cemetery – It was begun in 1874.
  6. Westcott and Schuller Cemeteries. Active from the 1860s to 1961.

Lunch is usually at a restaurant along I-45 or US 59.

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Houston Cemetery Tour J – East Northeast Houston

This tour is east of US 59, northeast of I-610 East, north of I-10, and within Beltway 8. It includes:

  1. Bradshaw Cemetery – This African American cemetery is partially abandoned and partially active. Recent burials date to 1999, 2002, and 2006. However, heavy brush and trees that have taken over the area for generations cover other headstones.
  2. Harris County Cemetery – Part II – This is a pauper cemetery. It has roughly 13,000 people over 18 acres and is nearly full. Harris County decided in 2010 to begin cremating any remains.
  3. Hart – Magee – Oates – Singleton Cemetery – Four white families established this cemetery in 1868. It is a still active cemetery.
  4. Oak Park Cemetery AKA Golden Gate Cemetery – This is an African American cemetery dating to 1935.
  5. Oates Negro Cemetery and Oates Prairie Negro Cemetery – This is an African American cemetery from the 1800s.
  6. San Jacinto Memorial Park and Funeral Home – It was formed in 1935.
  7. Sanders Cemetery – This is on Wallisville Road, northeast of Loop I-610.

Lunch is usually at a restaurant on I-10.

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Houston Cemetery Tour K – Far East

This tour is east from of I-610 East, South of I-10, west from the Grand Parkway/SH 99, and north of SH 225.  The cemeteries are located in Baytown, Pasadena, and La Porte. It includes:

  1. Cedar Crest Cemetery Inc. and Southeast Texas Memorials – This cemetery was established in 1930. It has perpetual care and is located in Baytown.
  2. Cedar Bayou Grace United Methodist Church Cemetery – This congregational cemetery has had burials since at least 1882. The church was organized in 1844. The ground is moist and the cemetery regularly floods when there is a heavy downpour as it buttresses Cedar Bayou. 
  3. Cedar Bayou Masonic Cemetery – This Baytown Masonic Cemetery has burials dating to 1892. It is by the Cedar Bayou Lodge #321 that was organized on May 17, 1884.
  4. Cedar Bayou Private Cemetery – This cemetery is closed off to vehicles. It is probably an old family cemetery in the same vicinity of the 3 other Cedar Bayou cemeteries.
  5. Crown Hill Cemetery – This cemetery was established in 1906. It has many of the early leaders of Pasadena. We pass the site of Vince's Bridge that Sam Houston had destroyed before the Battle of San Jacinto to prevent the Mexican troops from retreating. 
  6. De Zavala Cemetery – This dates to 1836 and is where heroes of the War of Texas Independence fought and died. It dates to April 21, 1836 and is located in the San Jacinto Battleground Park.

Lunch is usually at Monument Inn.

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Houston Cemetery Tour L – Far Southeast

This tour is southeast from I-610, south of SH 225, west from Galveston Bay, and northeast of I-45. Most of the cemeteries are in Deer Park, La Porte, and Pasadena. It includes:

  1. Bethany Cemetery – Located in Deer Park, this is a Catholic cemetery. It has no upright markers. It is next to Grandview Memorial Park Cemetery.
  2. Cedarhurst Cemetery – This La Porte cemetery has been neglected for generations, yet it is supposed to have perpetual care.
  3. Grandview Memorial Cemetery – This cemetery dates to 1953. 
  4. Hammer-McFaddin Cemetery – This is on the banks of Trinity Bayou. 
  5. Henry Cemetery – This family cemetery began in the 1870s. It has some of the earliest settlers to the area. It is on about ½ acre and has 25 graves. 
  6. Jackson and Wilson Gravesite – Located in Pasadena, this is the gravesite headstone for siblings Mary Wilson Jackson and William Wilson from 1834.  It was moved here in 1977 from a Shell Refinery location. No bodies are located here, but replicas of an 1836 cabin, outhouse, and other historic structures can be viewed. 
  7. La Porte Cemetery – Wealthy Houstonians began La Porte as a retreat for themselves, in 1892.

Lunch is usually in Deer Park or La Porte.

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Houston Cemetery Tour M – Far East by Northeast

This tour is east of Beltway 8, north of I-10, west of Cedar Bayou, and south of US 90/Crosby Freeway/Beaumont Highway.  Most of the cemeteries are in the towns of Crosby and Highlands. It includes:

  1. Barrett Station Evergreen Cemetery – This is an African American cemetery that was organized on January 7, 1928. 
  2. Baytown Memorial Cemetery – This is also known as Earthman Memory Gardens. The chapel is located at 3919 Garth Road, Houston, Texas.
  3. Berry Cemetery – In Crosby, Texas.  
  4. Black Hope Cemetery – This was an African America cemetery. Some people also believe that an Indian chief was buried here.  Destroyed in the Newport subdivision in Crosby.
  5. Chapel of the Pines Cemetery – This is a predominately Protestant cemetery. It was known as the Slovanska Podporujici Jednota Statu (Slavonik Benevolent Order of the State of Texas) (SPJST) Lodge Cemetery. It has many burials of Polish and Czech descent. It has a crematorium. It is adjacent to the Sacred Heart Cemetery.
  6. Eagleton Cemetery – This family cemetery is in Crosby. It is east of the Barrett Evergreen Cemetery.
  7. Evergreen Cemetery – Established in 1898, many of Crosby's most prominent citizens are buried here. Sralla Road, north of FM 1942 (Crosby-Barbers Hill Road). This was originally in a town called Barrett or Barrett Station.
  8. Harvey Cemetery – This was begun in 1900.  It only has 4 visible graves. 
  9. Highlands Cemetery – This is also known as Highlands Community Cemetery and Blalock Cemetery. Destroyed.
  10. Penn Cemetery – This cemetery was established in the 1830s. 
  11. St. Martin de Porres Cemetery – This is a Black Catholic cemetery. This has been known as the Blessed Martin Cemetery and St. Martin Cemetery.  Peruvian St. Martin de Porres (1579 – 1639) was a mulatto lay brother of the Dominican and is considered the patron saint of mixed race people and all those seeking interracial harmony. It is L shaped. It is adjacent to Sacred Heart Cemetery.
  12. Sacred Heart Cemetery – This White Catholic cemetery in Crosby was found in approximately 1917. It is adjacent to the Chapel of the Pines Cemetery and St. Martin de Porres Cemetery
  13. Simms Cemetery – This is a family cemetery in Crosby, Texas. 
  14. White Chapel Cemetery – This is the family cemetery for the Whites, a family with slaves, both of whom are buried here. The Whites were part of Stephen F. Austin's original 300 families who came to Texas to settle. The Whites arrived in 1822. The cemetery began in 1824.

Lunch is usually at a restaurant on the Crosby-Lynchburg Road.

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Houston Cemetery Tour N – Far North by Northeast

This tour is east from Beltway 8 and between US 90/Crosby Freeway/Beaumont Highway and US 59/Eastex Freeway, and west of the Grand Parkway/SH 99.  Most of the cemeteries are in Crosby. It includes:

  1. Harrington Cemetery – This is also known as Young's Graveyard. This is the oldest white cemetery in Harris County with the burial of James McDonald dating to 1822. 
  2. Lynch Cemetery – This is also known as Hollingsworth Cemetery and Jackson Cemetery. Members of the Austin's Old 300 were buried here. The cemetery dates to at least 1824. This was a plantation cemetery. Most of the burials have been moved to White Cemetery. 
  3. Seals-Cartwright Family Cemetery – This was the private cemetery for the Seals and Cartwright families. It is in a sunken basin and often inundated with water.

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Houston Cemetery Tour O – Far North

This tour is between Beltway 8 and the Grand Parkway/SH 99 and between US 59 and I-45.  Most of the cemeteries are in the Spring area.  Many of the families were German. This tour includes:

  1. Budde Cemetery – This is also known as the Budde-Holzwarth Cemetery.
  2. Earthman Resthaven Cemetery – This 110-acre cemetery, established in 1928, is the largest memorial park on this tour.
  3. Evangelical Church Cemetery – At Spring.
  4. Koinm/Koimn Cemetery – This family cemetery has between 9 and 11 visible headstones dating from circa 1899 to 1965. It is close to Humble.
  5. Schultz Cemetery – This is a family cemetery, in Spring.
  6. Spring Cemetery – It is also known as the Levington Cemetery and the Spring Methodist Cemetery.
  7. Spring Colored Cemetery – This is a historic African American cemetery in Spring.
  8. Trinity Lutheran Cemetery – It is also known as Westfield Lutheran Cemetery and St. Matthew Lutheran Cemetery. The Henry Kaiser family established it in the 1870s. It has over 455 burials.
  9. Wunsche Cemetery – This is a family cemetery.

Lunch is usually at a restaurant in Old Town Spring.

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Houston Cemetery Tour P – Far Northwest

This tour is between Beltway 8 and the Grand Parkway/SH 99 and between US 290 and I-45.  Most of the cemeteries are in the Klein, Tomball, and Cypress areas.  Many of the families were German. This tour includes:

  1. Borgestedt.
  2. Christen Cemetery – This cemetery is also known as Christen Family Cemetery
  3. Cypress Cemetery – This cemetery is also known as Cypress Community Cemetery.
  4. Dolen Cemetery.
  5. Fritsche-Neidorf (Neudorf) Cemetery – At Cypress, Texas.
  6. Huffmeister Cemetery – This cemetery is also known as Huffmeister Family Cemetery. Under lock and key.
  7. Klein Trinity Lutheran Cemetery – This cemetery has also been known at Klein Cemetery, Klein Lutheran Cemetery, and Westfield Cemetery.
  8. Knigge-Telge Cemetery – This is also known as Knigge Family Cemetery.
  9. Kolbe Cemetery – This is also known as Kolbe Family Cemetery. No information.
  10. Moitz-Kluge Cemetery – This is also known as Moitz-Kluge Family Cemetery.
  11. Mueller Cemetery – This is also known as Mueller Family Cemetery.
  12. Nuemeyer (Neumeyer) Cemetery.
  13. St. John’s Evangelical (Lutheran) Cemetery – Cypress, Texas.
  14. Tomball Cemetery.
  15. Zahn Cemetery – This cemetery began in 1872. This is also known as Stuebner Cemetery.

Lunch is usually at a restaurant on Tomball Parkway/SH 249.

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